Sunshine & Sparkle!

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Key chains with PIZAZZ! These key chains are shiny and glamorous! They both can be used strictly as key chains, or also clipped to a zipper, backpack, phone, and more! Matching clip attached! On the left is “Golden Nuggets” and on the right is “Summer Green”. These are rich in golds and bright color!

Price: 15.00 each

Canoeing

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Do you like to go camping, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, kayaking or canoeing? If so, this canvas piece is for you! The canoe and oar give you that outdoor feel! Decorative paper decoupaged to canvas. Size: 10″ x 8 ”

Price: 15.00

Vintage Metal Buttons!

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Vintage Metal Buttons are some of the most beautiful buttons you will find!

You will want to use a polishing cloth to clean them! Moisture and oils from our hands tend to cause metals to deteriorate.

Brass is very common for metal buttons. It can look just like gold, but without the heaviness or price.

Pewter buttons contain lead, so something neat with these buttons, is if you rub them on paper, you’ll see a “pencil” mark. Here is something pretty cool – you can buff your pewter button with the outer leaf from a cabbage head, and then, of course, follow up with a soft, dry cloth.

If you have a Steel button, a magnet will identify it. You will want to handle steel buttons as little as possible. Rust can be removed with an ink eraser, and you can clean with small cloths, like the ones to clean your eye glasses!

*Some information taken from Warman’s Buttons Field Guide by Jill Gorski.

Ahhh . . . Filigree!

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Filigree Buttons – The word filigree is derived from the Latin word “filum” (meaning thread). It is ornamental openwork of delicate or intricate design.

Filigree suggests ‘lace’ in its design. It has a very specific feminine look since 1660 to present. Every year the filigree look is somewhere in fashion!

These button examples are in vintage and antique metal and plastic. So beautiful!

Blueberry Patch

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The inspiration for this canvas piece was a couple of trips years ago driving into Nacogdoches, Texas, and seeing the lovely Blueberry patches for the very first time! I was just amazed! The background color of the canvas is an Antique White, and there are some very unique vintage buttons used in this creation! Size 8″ x 10″

Price: 22.50

Waterbury Button Company – Uniform Buttons!

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I have several of these Waterbury Button Company Uniform buttons – they are U.S. Army, Vietnam War Class A jacket – 1st Cavalry Airmobile Division.

I did some research on the Waterbury Button Company – so interesting!

Founded in wartime in the early 19th century, The Waterbury Button Company has been making stamped metal buttons for over 200 years!

Some notable mentions:

1812 – When General Ulysses S. Grant met General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Courthouse, both men wore Waterbury buttons on their chests.

1870 – The Waterbury Button Company undertakes production of a new, wondrous material – celluloid. Lustrous buttons made of celluloid fill a fashion trend.

1917 – The U.S. enters World War I, and the Waterbury Button Company steps into a well rehearsed role as primary supplier of uniform buttons for the armed forces.

1920’s – The company is heavily involved in the toy business, manufacturing aluminum toys such as airplanes, candy banks, tractors, etc.

1925 – It is among the first manufacturers to mold a new plastic called Bakelite into buttons.

1939 – “Gone With the Wind” – Actors playing Confederate and Union soldiers wear costumes bearing authentic buttons specially produced for the epic movie by The Waterbury Button Company.

1997 – Hollywood calls again: The crew of the ill-fated R.M.S. Titanic, part of the White Star Line, wore Waterbury buttons. The company is tapped to make replicas for the costumes worn by actors playing crew members in the blockbuster movie, “Titanic”.

 

1930’s Pin!

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This amazing pin is one I just found in a grouping of Vintage/Antique buttons recently, and did some research, and it is a beautiful “Faux Coral Molded Celluloid with tiny pearls” pin. It is from the 1930’s era. Very unique!